Home / Space News Daily / Curiosity Mars Rover: Hopping from Outcrop to Outcrop

Curiosity Mars Rover: Hopping from Outcrop to Outcrop

Spread the love

Curiosity Entrance Hazcam Left B picture taken on Sol 2358, March 25, 2019.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover has simply began performing Sol 2359 duties.

“At first of Sol 2359, Curiosity discovered herself parked in entrance of some layered bedrock outcrops, a rarity within the rubbly landscapes that we’ve explored to this point within the clay-bearing unit,” reviews Vivian Solar, a planetary geologist at NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

“We had been constrained by energy in right this moment’s plan, however managed to make use of each out there minute for science,” Solar provides.

Curiosity Navcam Left B picture acquired on Sol 2357, March 24, 2019.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

Detailed texture

As a part of routine documentation of the chemical and textural variations on this area, the rover’s Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) can be making observations of “Rutherglen” to measure composition and detailed texture.

Curiosity Mars Hand Lens Imager picture produced on Sol 2357, March 24, 2019. MAHLI is positioned on the turret on the finish of the rover’s robotic arm.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity’s Chemistry and Digicam (ChemCam) will even measure the composition of “Woodland Bay,” one other bedrock publicity within the workspace.

 

Outcrop layering and construction

“We will even take a few Mastcam mosaics – one of many complete workspace to get a greater have a look at the outcrop layering and construction, and to carry shade to the tonal variations within the Navcam photographs,” Solar explains. One other Mastcam mosaic can be of “Goosander,” an aeolian bedform that additionally exhibits tonal variations.

Solar notes that discussions are underway the place Curiosity will subsequent drive.

Float rock – a meteroite? Curiosity Mastcam Left picture taken on Sol 2357, March 24, 2019.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Driving choices

“One tempting choice was to drive to a lone float rock,” Solar says. “We puzzled what might this be – a meteorite, or a remnant of a better, eroded unit?”

Float rock – lonely meteorite within the distance? Navcam Left B Sol 2357 March 24, 2019
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech

An alternative choice was to drive to a close-by space that appears to include delicate ridges.

“Given the prevalence of ridges and comparable options within the clay-bearing unit, we determined that it was necessary to drive to the ridges and set ourselves up for contact science on these options,” Solar factors out.

Curiosity Navcam Proper B picture acquired on Sol 2358, March 25, 2019.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Phobos transit

“From our future location, we will even have the chance to picture that float rock in addition to a close-by butte. To facilitate these future observations, we added a post-drive Mastcam workspace mosaic so that we’ll have shade imagery to help in focusing on within the subsequent plan,” Solar reviews.

Lastly, after a drive of roughly 98 toes (30 meters) to the small ridges, Curiosity will make observations of a Phobos transit and a Mastcam tau, adopted by ChemCam Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Elevated Science, or AEGIS.

AEGIS observations are designed to autonomously shoot ChemCam targets after driving to a brand new location, Solar concludes.

Curiosity Mastcam Left picture taken on Sol 2357, March 24, 2019.
Credit score: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 


Source link

About admin

Check Also

Minecraft on PS4 Now Supports Cross-Platform Play, Bedrock Edition – IGN

Spread the love Minecraft has announced that starting tomorrow, December 10, 2019, the Bedrock version …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *